Javanese Lulur Spa

Javanese Lulur Spa

Javanese Lulur Spa is one of traditional Spa that really famous in Indonesia. The name may sound peculiar, but this multi-step beauty treatment has been popping up in spas all over the West in the last few years. Translated to mean “coating of the skin,” the modern lulur (pronounced “loo-loor”) spa service has its roots in a traditional Javanese (Indonesian) ritual enjoyed by women on each of the 40 days leading up to her wedding. (Many spas call their service a “Royal Lulur,” but while it began with the royal princesses of Central Java in the 17th century, over time many middle class brides took part in it, as well.) Historically, the service included a bath, scrub/wrap and a massage, and was performed for the bride by the other women in her family, who would use the downtime to reconnect with each other, pass on advice and soothe any anxieties of the newlywed-to-be-as well as beautify her for her big day.

These days anyone-bride or not- can partake in the service to help rejuvenate skin and relax the mind and body. The session typically starts with a thorough body scrub using a paste of potent herbs: turmeric to brighten skin, reduce pigmentation and work as an antiseptic and anti-inflammatory; sandalwood to hydrate and relax; rice to exfoliate; and jasmine, an anti-depressant and aphrodisiac. They’re all mixed together in a base of yogurt, which works to moisturize dry skin, and, with its natural enzymes, gently slough off dead cells. After the scrub comes a relaxing bath-usually in a floral- or milk-based soak-followed by a Balinese massage, in which long, repetitive motions are used to work out knots and kinks. Ancient wisdom held that by having the service for so many days before her wedding, a young bride would both be glowing, and relaxed enough to conceive on her wedding night. While modern spas make no such promises with their lulurs, they do deliver polished, dewy skin and a deep sense of relaxation.